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"A co-worker closed the door to the staff room behind him.
It locked automatically
and I started planning what I could use as a weapon:
smash the glass beside the fridge into his eye.
pick up the fork next to me and sink it into his leg.
claw him across the face if I couldn’t get to anything in time.
As I calculated how hard it would be to shove his body weight off of me,
he finished making his lunch, said, “Sup,” and left,
the door automatically locking behind him.
I expect if I told him I was prepared to stab him with the corner of my staff ID if I had to,
he would say what I’ve heard too often, the one we all know
but are getting wearily suspicious of:
Not all men are like That.

When I was eleven, all the girls in my class got sent to self-defence
because they assumed we’d need it one day.
When I was twelve, there was a prostitute’s body dumped in the river next to my house
because someone thought she was disposable.
When I was thirteen, it happened again and this time the man went to jail
and people stood outside the courtroom and held up signs that he did the right thing.
When I was fourteen, my friend showed up to a sleepover late, chest heaving from sobbing
and from running four blocks after getting chased by a man that followed her off the bus.
When I was fifteen, my mother accused me of being a Man Hater
and I said, “No, but god, would you blame me if I was?”

I got catcalled and then got laughed at when I flipped them off.
they pulled up beside me and I clutched my bag tighter,
my hand going in for my keys and my mind going over how their noses would look
if I smashed them in with my elbow.
“What’s the big deal,” the guy at the steering wheel asked. “We’re just complimenting you. We’re not like That.”

Sorry, but I’m not going to trust you in case I end up on a poster labelled ‘MISSING.’
Even if you seem like the nicest guy, I’ll still have one hand holding my keys
as the only knife I’m allowed, because I don’t know how far you’re going to take it:
if you won’t back off when I tell you I don’t want to date you
if you’ll shout BITCH at me when I don’t respond well to your catcall
if you’ll expect my body as a reward for treating me like a human being
if you’ll try to take what you think you’re owed by being a man
if you’ll turn me into another statistic that people shudder away from.

I have been trained to assume that it’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing
or face the consequences.
I don’t know if you’ll nod when I reject you
or pump me full of bullets.

Every single woman I’ve talked to has a story where they haven’t felt safe in their own body
because of what a man said or did.

Not all men are like That, but god, it’s enough."

'Welcome to Girlhood: None Of Us Are Safe,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)

theappleppielifestyle
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"Most of the world’s exploited labor comes from women. Women work in the sweatshops and the giant factories. Women sow and tend and harvest the world’s crops. Women carry and birth and raise children. Women wash and clean and shop and cook. Women care for the sick and the elderly. All of this - layer upon layer of labor - is what makes human society possible. Ripping it off is what makes capitalism possible."

Exodus and Reconstruction: Working-Class Women at the Heart of Globalization (via amodernmanifesto)

and this is why effective feminism has to be anti capitalist

(via genderheretic)

amodernmanifesto
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milominderbindered:

orange is the new black meme

[1/3] friendships: Poussey Washington and Taystee Jefferson

I didn’t mean to let you down.

milominderbindered
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kyssthis16:

kissmyconverse22:

cariosity:

trebled-negrita-princess:

lovelifelaurennn:

thisbitchyellsback:

phosphorescentt:

septemberism94:

why test on animals when there are prisons full of rapists

because the prisons aren’t actually full of rapists

the rapists run free and the prisons are full of people charged with weed possession

OOOOPS

image

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Plus ethics morals and all that jazz….

image

septemberism94
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extrasensoryphotography
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"You’re not like other black girls"

militantblackradical:

I’m called an Oreo. It means I’m black on the outside and white on the inside.

It’s my voice. 

I have a very very proper voice, I enunciate and pronounce words very clearly. I sound like I stepped out of speech class at any given moment.

This in the eyes of white people makes me a “good” black person, I’m not like “other” black people. I’m considered better than other black people because I “act” white. So they tell me “you’re not like other black girls” and smile like I’ve done a great thing.

This brings up a couple points. 

  1. White people have some monopoly on proper speech
  2. Proper English is better than speaking AAVE
  3. There’s something wrong with being like other black people
  4. I’m trying to act like white people for some reason and that makes me a “good” black person.

Next I’ll just address the points 

1)This is just stupid. It’s standard English and anyone can speak it. Many black people “code switch” between proper English and AAVE. Additionally it provides no cultural significance to white people, so literally anyone can use it.

2) The fact that white people think that “proper” English is the best/only way is racist of them. Different dialects of English can’t be compared as better or worse. They are different and equal, because they all communicate the language. The idea that “proper” English is the only way is a racist attempt to disregard minorities and minimize their methods of communication. 

3) Why is it such a good thing to be not like other black people. Radfems often point out how its problematic to say “not like other girls” but don’t do the same for race. In fact some may just ignore the racism in being “not like other (blank)”  or worse yet say it themselves. There’s nothing wrong with being like other black people and the idea that it is plays into racism in the community that generally goes untouched. Furthermore radfems may fall into the trap of calling people like me “not black enough”  in an effort to shun all things white. That is still putting up racist requirements to what it means to be black.

4) White supremacy. That’s the only explanation for this. Attributing traits to white people and those things making me a better black person is saying that the closer I am to white the better I am. 

So that’s just one of my experiences that cause white criticism. Because this is something white people say to me with a smile. They laugh and call me an Oreo. Why do white people say this to me? Why do they say it like I’ve done a great job at something by “acting” like them. The implications for such a sentence or buried in white supremacy and rooted in racism.

In conclusion, telling me I’m not like other black people, is not a complement. If anything all I hear is “being white is better”  

viasource
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seriouslyamerica:

The Rugrats don’t have time for your gender-essentialist bullshit.

seriouslyamerica
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"[Pro-sex-trade] Men… are able to equate sex with a service or commodity because they don’t think a woman’s actual desire for sex is necessary to the sex act. It’s the way men have always defined heterosexual sex under patriarchy: women are holes to be fucked by men, and thus their feelings – be they fear, pain, unhappiness, boredom or revulsion – while they are being penetrated are irrelevant. If men actually believed that a woman’s independent desire to participate in sex was a necessary condition for sex to take place, there would be no market for prostitution."

Commenter Donkey Skin on Feminist Current Article (via etreconnue)

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badveganwolf:

rinattante:

please be kind to insects. carry moths outdoors and step over ant hills when possible. help bees out of puddles and pools and direct others to the nearest safe surface when they land on your shoulder. they are just tiny kids trying to navigate a big world.

this is a nice post

rinattante
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pinkmanjesse
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simplysheerene:

7.15.14||”Hairspectations”

I got so much crap when I cut my hair the second time. All I heard was, “you have such beautiful hair why did you cut it?” When my hair got long enough I got loc extensions. I heard nothing but praise. “Now you look like a woman.” “Don’t ever cut your hair again, you look so much better.” Until I went home and my grandparents gave me crap for having locs.

I am not my hair. And no matter how I choose to style it, I look beautiful. My hair and what I choose to do with it does not define me nor does it concern you. And no matter how I wear it I look divine because of who I am, not what is on my head.

simplysheerene
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demandingdream:

the most annoying thing on earth is when non-vegans call vegan food gross like you are literally eating a dead animals flesh don’t fucking start w/ me

xvxloser
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princemotorcycle:

cows: look at this tiny cow is he okay?

dog: these big dogs are pretty cool

australiangoop
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What is love?

claudiasentada
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