Install Theme
expressions-of-nature
viasource

"How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “you’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.


Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul."

moxie-bird
viasource

columbiaofficial:

"bitch" has hurt almost every one us before

if you have overcome that and can now sincerely enjoy it as a label, sweet, but that isn’t necessarily true for the rest of us

plus do you think men are going to use “bitch” to mean Babe In Total Control of Herself? NAH they’re gonna use it to confine and control women’s confidence and aggression like always

columbiaofficial
viasource

killbenedictcumberbatch:

why do white people think having a confederate flag anywhere on your property screams anything other than “im a blatant racist and slavery was cool”

killbenedictcumberbatch
viasource
redirisheyes
viasource
speakallowed
viasource

goddess—nike:

I think it’s really important that everyone recognize and acknowledge that women feeling physically aroused by shows of male aggression, dominance and violence isn’t evidence that they should have kinky sex, it’s evidence that women are socialized so intensely to be submissive and tolerate serious abuse that we actually trick ourselves into thinking that our arousal is organic.

And what’s worse? Men swoop in and take full advantage of our grooming to gleefully commit sexual violence against us.

viasource

sad-cannibal-noises:

Offensive things aren’t offensive merely because they hurt feelings - they’re offensive because they contribute to the societal harm of marginalized groups. The end goal isn’t to get everyone to love each other, it’s to destroy power imbalances.

frederdick-chilton
viasource
jezunya:

[x]
Of course, the majority of the responding tweets were from men denying the idea that there’s any sexism in the tech industries, saying that women’s individual stories and all the statistics about low female-to-male ratios and high occurrences of harassment are all biased or exaggerated, or else admitting that yeah, all that’s true, but women just need to be patient and wait for things to get better, someday, somehow, without any need for anyone to acknowledge that it’s a problem, much less do anything about it.
…But they’re totally not sexist.

jezunya:

[x]

Of course, the majority of the responding tweets were from men denying the idea that there’s any sexism in the tech industries, saying that women’s individual stories and all the statistics about low female-to-male ratios and high occurrences of harassment are all biased or exaggerated, or else admitting that yeah, all that’s true, but women just need to be patient and wait for things to get better, someday, somehow, without any need for anyone to acknowledge that it’s a problem, much less do anything about it.

…But they’re totally not sexist.

viasource

greedycaitlin:

Vegan Jumbo Pasta Shells Stuffed with Basil Almond Feta with Creamy Tomato Basil Sauce

greedycaitlin
viasource
be-a-riot-grrrl
viasource

oakapples:

'Unimproved' grassland. These sorts of diverse habitats have all but disappeared in Britain over the past fifty years, thanks to the popular belief that drowning these grasslands in fertiliser (which allows coarse grass species to out-compete most of the wildflowers) would provide agricultural benefits. Yet British farming remains in a precarious position, and in the meantime we have destroyed a wealth of botanical (and attendant zoological) richness and beauty.

If you’re interested in helping with the arduous but heroic work being undertaken by conservationists (many of them amateur) to restore some of our lost grasslands, take a look at the websites of the Grasslands Trust (http://www.grasslands-trust.org/and the British Grassland Society (http://www.britishgrassland.com/).

oakapples
viasource
humansofnewyork:

"It’s for my Queer and Feminist Comparative Literature Theory class." “Let me write that down…” “I took it more for the teacher than the class. My school was all-male until the sixties, and she was one of the first teachers at the women’s college. She’s really respected.” “So what’s one important thing she’s taught you?” “… about how it’s important for feminists to evaluate everyday occurrences. How even routine personal interactions are political. Everything is significant, and even little things have meaning.” “Is it possible to see too much meaning in little things?” “Well, there does seem to be some people who go around looking for things to be angry about. But if the alternative is to be desensitized to how small things affect us, I think it’s better to be overly sensitive.”

humansofnewyork:

"It’s for my Queer and Feminist Comparative Literature Theory class."
“Let me write that down…”
“I took it more for the teacher than the class. My school was all-male until the sixties, and she was one of the first teachers at the women’s college. She’s really respected.”
“So what’s one important thing she’s taught you?”
“… about how it’s important for feminists to evaluate everyday occurrences. How even routine personal interactions are political. Everything is significant, and even little things have meaning.”
“Is it possible to see too much meaning in little things?”
“Well, there does seem to be some people who go around looking for things to be angry about. But if the alternative is to be desensitized to how small things affect us, I think it’s better to be overly sensitive.”

humansofnewyork
viasource

"i just need to get my shit together"

me in 2009/2012/this time last year/a minute ago/next year probably (via dutchster)

omegaqueer
viasource
hamstring
viasource